Wednesday, January 15, 2014

N.S.A. Devises Radio Pathway into Computers...



N.S.A. Devises Radio Pathway into Computers...






Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Potential Martians: Mars One selects 1,058 hopefuls among 200,000 applicants



Re-posted from:  Google NEWS & RT NEWS
Potential Martians: Mars One selects 1,058
hopefuls among 200,000 applicants




“We’re extremely appreciative and impressed with the sheer
number of people who submitted their applications,”





The Mars One project has announced the selection of 1,058 hopefuls from over 200,000 applicants to become potential “human ambassadors” on the Red Planet. Eventually, no more than 40 people will be selected to go Mars to never return.


“We’re extremely appreciative and impressed with the sheer number of people who submitted their applications,” Mars One Co-Founder and CEO Bas Lansdorp said, putting an end to the second round of the application process.
“However, the challenge with 200,000 applicants is separating those who we feel are physically and mentally adept to become human ambassadors on Mars from those who are obviously taking the mission much less seriously.”
According to The Popular science magazine report, there are 55 per cent male and 45 per cent female among 1,058 chosen. Some 63 per cent of them hold a bachelor's degree and 3 percent hold a medical degree.
The majority of the applicants are aged between 26 and 55 - 65 per cent of all selected hopefuls- and 2 per cent are older than 55.
Those who did not receive emails, notifying of their application status, should not become despondent. There is a chance they can reapply later. But the date has not been set yet.
“US astronaut Clayton Anderson was rejected by NASA for its astronaut training program 15 times, yet in 2007 he boarded the Space Shuttle Atlantis for a trip to the International Space Station. He proved anything can happen and the door is never completely closed,” Lansdorp recalled.
The first round of the Mars One Astronaut Selection Program saw applications from 202,586 people from around the world. Initially Lansdorp expected one million applications.
The whole Selection Program includes four rounds and is planned to last till 2015. During this time, the applicant pool will be narrowed to dozens of people - six to ten teams of four individuals will be selected for seven years of full-time training before heading to Mars.
“The next several selection phases in 2014 and 2015 will include rigorous simulations, many in team settings, with focus on testing the physical and emotional capabilities of our remaining candidates,” Dr. Norbert Kraft, Chief Medical Officer for Mars One said.
But the details of the further selection phases have not been agreed yet as negotiations for the rights to broadcast the process are still ongoing. Lansdorp said the next phase of the Mars One project should be televised starting in 2014.
"We fully anticipate our remaining candidates to become celebrities in their towns, cities, and in many cases, countries. It's about to get very interesting," he said.
Mars One, a Dutch not-for-profit organization, is relying on donations, which it directs to the human mission to Mars. It is currently trying to raise money to send a satellite and lander to Mars in 2018, which will allow them to live-stream events straight from the red planet.
On December, Mars One contracted Lockheed Martin and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) to develop mission concept studies.
Before people will be able to colonize Mars there is a demonstration mission planned for 2018. It will provide proof of concept for some of the technologies that are important for a permanent human settlement on Mars.


Sunday, December 29, 2013


Reposted from: Google NEWS
NASA Developing the Super Ball Bot Capable
of Absorbing the Impact
of a Hard Planetary Landing


NASA is developing a Super Ball Bot that will be capable of
observing the impact of a solid planetary landing by
squishing and bouncing till it comes to a halt.



*


NASA is developing a Super Ball Bot that will be capable of observing the impact of a solid planetary landing by squishing and bouncing till it comes to a halt. A mesh of poles and ropes that appears to like an evilly jerking tent may be the pioneer of a future robotic explorer. This would be dropped from a height of 100 km onto Saturn’s moon, Titan, and that too without a parachute.
The building up of the Super Ball Bot is an endeavor to make stiff and flexible parts forming an insubstantial shock-absorbing mechanically controlled exoskeleton. It is hoped that it will permit the explorer to survive the fall to Titan and will also be utilized for locomotion on the surface.


The project is being developed by Vytas SunSpiral and Adrian Agogino at the NASA Ames Research Center. The study is published in IEEE Spectrum magazine.
The idea relies on the concept of tensegrity. The same principle works in biology, with muscles, bones and tendons functioning in unison.
The technology has a major problem. Rovers like the Curiosity are mainly controlled from Earth and controls one component at one time.
SunSpiral and Agogino are functioning on a solution that would permit the bot to work automatically. The team is looking at biologically-inspired control mechanisms that make use of oscillatory signals, which are related to the central pattern generators (CPGs) used in multi-limbed robots.
Submitted by Busta Sebetseba on Sun, 12/29/2013 - 12:57


Saturday, December 28, 2013

Emerging Space Race: Could The New Space Race Boost Commercial Space Flights?



Repost from: Google NEWS and American Live Wire
Emerging Space Race: Could The New Space Race Boost Commercial Space Flights?




New space race emerging as more countries achieve goals with space programs

  • Approximately 70 countries have space programs

  • Russia, China, and India appear to be vying for the title in the new space race



New space race
Image at Wikipedia





A new space race appears to be budding with 

China, India, and Russia vying for the title.


 China watched its first lunar rover, Jade Rabbit, successfully land on the moon sending photos back to Earth before beginning its mission earlier this month.
“Now as Jade Rabbit has made its touchdown on the moon surface the whole world again marvels at China’s remarkable space capabilities.” claims state-run Xinhua news agency.  China’s Cabinet, and the Central Military Commission hailed the mission as a “milestone” in the development of China’s space programs, a “new glory” in Chinese explorations and the “outstanding contribution” of China in mankind’s peaceful use of space, Xinhua said.

India launched its first orbitor with a course set for Mars in November.  The Mangalyaan spacecraft has successfully left Earth’s gravitational pull and is set to reach Mars in September of 2014.  “These missions are important. These are things that give Indians happiness and bragging rights,” said Raghu Kalra of the Amateur Astronomers Association Delhi. “Even a poor person, when he learns that my country is sending a mission to another planet, he will feel a sense of pride for his country, and he will want to make it a better place.”
Among this new space race, approximately 70 countries currently have space programs.

 The pressure is on the U.S. to stay abreast if not on top of the new space race, and aid these budding space programs.
Buzz Aldrin , former astronaut states, “A number of nations have evolved their capabilities to put humans into space and beyond Earth.  We should help contribute to their exploration.”
Although the U.S. may still barely hold the forefront of space programs due to its success with the difficult maneuvering and deposit of the Curiosity on Mars, how long will this grasp stay valid?  NASA now receives approximately 0.5 percent of the federal budget that had originally been four percent during the initial space race.  Next year’s budget is slated to be $18 billion with some in Congress wishing for further cuts.

Currently, the only way that NASA has to get astronauts to the International Space Station is to hitch a ride with Russia for $71 million.  NASA’s ultimate goal is to have private companies take astronauts to the ISS.  The need that NASA’s budget shortcomings has created has opened up lucrative opportunities in the private market, which may eventually lead to commercial space flights becoming common practice.